Memorials to Fallen K-9s 
 2010-
J

The F.A.S.T. Co. donates sets of memorial cards to all partners 
 I need your help to inform me of such losses.


Dept. addresses available for those who want to send condolences to officers. See below
In Loving Memory of
K9 JOHNNI
2010 

looking for Photo and date...

Handler:  Officer Bill Franklin
Logan Twp. Police Dept.
PA
 
K-9 Johnni has forever left his mark on the history of the Logan Twp. Police Department. The Department's first Police Dog,
Johnni faithfully served his partner Bill Franklin and together they helped keep the residents of Logan Twp. safe.
 Thank you for your service Johnni and thank you to the Franklin family for taking such good care of him
during throughout his faithful service.

Guardians Of The Night
Author - Unknown

Trust in me my friend for I am your comrade. I will protect you
with my last breath When all others have left you And the
loneliness of the night closes in, I will be at your side.

Together we will conquer all obstacles, And search out
those who might wish harm to others. All I ask of you is
compassion, The caring touch of your hands. It is for you that I
will unselfishly give my life And spend my nights unrested.
Although our days together May be marked by the passing
of the seasons Know that each day at your side is my reward.

My days are measured by The coming and going of your
footsteps. I anticipate them at every opening of the door. You
are the voice of caring when I am ill. The voice of authority
when I've done wrong.

Do not chastise me unduly For I am your right arm, The sword
at your side. I attempt to do only what you bid of me. I seek
only to please you and remain in your favor.

Together you and I shall experience A bond only others
like us will understand When outsiders see us together Their
envy will be measured by their disdain.

I will quietly listen to you and pass no judgment, Nor will your
spoken words be repeated I will remain ever silent, Ever vigilant,
ever loyal. And when our time together is done And you move
on in the world Remember me with kind thoughts and tales,
For a time we were unbeatable, Nothing passed among us
undetected.

If we should meet again on another street I will gladly take
up your fight, I am a Police Working Dog and together.
We are guardians of the night. 


In Loving Memory of
K9 JUSTICE
December 28, 2010

Handler: Charles "Tony" Howard
Springfield Police Department
130 Pearl Street
Springfield, MA 01105
Non-emergency matters: 413.787.6302

The Springfield Police Department is mourning the loss of two of the force's K-9 dogs. Sergeant John Delaney told 22News that one of the dogs, Nitro, died December 22 from an infection in the lungs. Nitro was partnered with Officer Barry Delamarter and spent 9 and a half years with Officer Delamarter. Both worked with the "Street Crime Unit." The other dog, Justice, died on December 28 after being diagnosed with malignant tumors. Justice was partnered with Sergeant Charles "Tony" Howard. They were also assigned to the "Street Crime Unit." Both of the dogs helped police find lost children and the elderly. They also tracked-down suspected criminals. Sergeant Delaney said that both dogs were an important part of the Springfield Police Department. Delaney said the last time the police department lost a K-9, the public offered donations to replace the dog. K-9 dogs are expensive and are specifically trained for police work.
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA


In Loving Memory of
K9 JOHNNY
December 11, 2010
   

Handler: O
fficer Brian Zebron
La Salle Police Department
add? 745 Second St.
LaSalle, IL  61301
1 815.223.3755

WEBSITE - http://lasalle-il.gov/content/police-department-2102010103718am.aspx

 La Salle police remember beloved K-9
La Salle police officer Brian Zebron said goodbye to a former partner and longtime pet this week. As old age and leg problems set in, former La Salle police dog Johnny was put to sleep Monday night. "I still remember his first arrest like it was yesterday. It was a couple pot pipes and two grams of weed, it was real small but you remember it,” Zebron said. Over the course of eight years with the department, Johnny, a mixed breed of German shepherd and Belgian Malinois descent, would go on to find much more than just a couple grams of marijuana.

Within his first few weeks on the job, Johnny was being honored by the city council for his part in responding to 23 drug-related calls, resulting in nine arrests and the discovery and seizure of 2 pounds of marijuana, 17 drug pipes, and $530, the News Tribune reported at the time. During his career Johnny assisted with a number of large drug busts on local interstates, Zebron noted. “Having a dog is a very appreciated asset,” said La Salle police detective Mike Smudzinski. Some of Johnny’s days on the force were during a period when there were few local K-9 units, which meant he and Zebron were busy working all around the area, assisting on searches from west of Princeton to east of Marseilles.
“Now we have about 14 K-9 between La Salle and Bureau County and there were times when we were down to three or four,” Zebron said. Smudzinski joined the La Salle department at the same time as Zebron in 1997. Over the years, he’s gained a lot of respect for Zebron and his K-9 partners.  “(Zebron’s) one of the most dedicated, hardworking K-9 officers I’ve ever seen, who puts a lot of effort into making his dogs work exceptionally well,” Smudzinski said. Johnny joined the department in 2000, taking over duties for former K-9 Cash, a black Labrador that focused on drug busts.
“When we got Johnny, drug work was a huge part of what he did, but he also did multi-purpose,” Zebron said. The other purposes included building searches, protecting his handler and other officers — “Which came in handy, especially with bar fights downtown,” Zebron said — and tracking. Zebron can remember Johnny using his powerful nose to uncover a loaded handgun thrown by a suspect during a foot chase at night as well as chasing down suspects that ran away from human police officers. “He didn’t have the speed lately, but in his prime it didn’t take him long to catch up to the suspect,” Zebron said.
Despite all the exciting action, Zebron said his favorite memories with Johnny were the days they’d visit school children to put on demonstrations. After retiring in 2008, Johnny went home with Zebron where he became the family pet and was joined not long after by Zebron’s current K-9 partner Justis. “I look at Johnny, he had eight years of non-stop fun every time he went out,” Zebron said. “I know in my mind he had the best life he could have.”
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA


In Loving Memory of
K9 JEECHO
October 1, 2010

Handler: Officer Stafford Brister
Wilmington Police Department

615 Bess Street
Wilmington, NC 28402

website - http://www.ci.wilmington.nc.us/police_department.aspx

Police dog that excelled at tracking suspects dies

Jeecho, a German shepherd, was a canine cop with the Wilmington Police Department. He died peacefully Friday.
He was one of the furrier members of Wilmington's police force, a four-legged crime-fighting machine with a powerful set of jaws and a keen sense of smell to boot. His name was Jeecho, and he was a German shepherd. More than three years after his retirement as a canine cop with the Wilmington Police Department, Jeecho peacefully passed away surrounded by friends and family last Friday. He was 12 years old. His handler, Officer Stafford Brister, remembers Jeecho as steadfast in the line of fire, a dog who was always willing to take a real bite out of crime. We had a very unique bond,” Brister said Thursday. “I had all the confidence in him, and he had all the confidence in me. I guess that's what makes it really hard. ... He wasn't just a dog; he was my partner.” Jeecho arrived at the police department in 2003. At the age of 3, Jeecho quickly learned the ins and outs of canine police work and was out in the field in about three months, Brister said. He was certified as a patrol, narcotic and tracking dog numerous times through the U.S. Police Canine Association.
He was one of the furrier members of Wilmington's police force, a four-legged crime-fighting machine with a powerful set of jaws and a keen sense of smell to boot. His name was Jeecho, and he was a German shepherd. More than three years after his retirement as a canine cop with the Wilmington Police Department, Jeecho peacefully passed away surrounded by friends and family last Friday. He was 12 years old. His handler, Officer Stafford Brister, remembers Jeecho as steadfast in the line of fire, a dog who was always willing to take a real bite out of crime.  He was one of the furrier members of Wilmington's police force, a four-legged crime-fighting machine with a powerful set of jaws and a keen sense of smell to boot. His name was Jeecho, and he was a German shepherd. More than three years after his retirement as a canine cop with the Wilmington Police Department, Jeecho peacefully passed away surrounded by friends and family last Friday. He was 12 years old. His handler, Officer Stafford Brister, remembers Jeecho as steadfast in the line of fire, a dog who was always willing to take a real bite out of crime.  "We had a very unique bond,” Brister said Thursday. “I had all the confidence in him, and he had all the confidence in me. I guess that's what makes it really hard. ... He wasn't just a dog; he was my partner.” Jeecho arrived at the police department in 2003. At the age of 3, Jeecho quickly learned the ins and outs of canine police work and was out in the field in about three months, Brister said. He was certified as a patrol, narcotic and tracking dog numerous times through the U.S. Police Canine Association.
During his tenure, Jeecho was responsible for the seizure of several hundred pounds of narcotics and approximately $200,000 in drug money. He was best, however, at tracking suspects, and he wasn't afraid to sink his teeth into a criminal trying to evade arrest.  Jeecho won a slew of awards in both regional and national competitions. Between 2003 and 2005, he was recognized by the USPCA for three separate incidents where he helped apprehend suspects wanted on serious felony charges, including one where he tracked down the occupants and driver who ran away from a vehicular homicide, Brister said. But arthritis in his later years finally forced Jeecho into medical retirement in 2007. He served his remaining years comfortably at home with Brister. “He was my best friend and my partner at work,” Brister said. “We fought some hard criminals together. He was always there for me and I always there for him.” Jeecho now holds a place on his handler's mantel, his ashes resting in a wooden urn. 
“We had a very unique bond,” Brister said Thursday. “I had all the confidence in him, and he had all the confidence in me. I guess that's what makes it really hard. ... He wasn't just a dog; he was my partner.” Jeecho arrived at the police department in 2003. At the age of 3, Jeecho quickly learned the ins and outs of canine police work and was out in the field in about three months, Brister said. He was certified as a patrol, narcotic and tracking dog numerous times through the U.S. Police Canine Association."
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA

In Loving Memory of
K9 JAKE
Oct. 2010

 

Sgt. Scott Lindsley #191
Melbourne Police Department
Day watch "A" Shift Supervisor
321-409-2200 (3317)
slindsley@melbourneflorida.org

I just wanted to drop you a line and let you know my K9 partner of 7 years had to be put down last week after he suffered a severe compressed disk in his spine which caused him to lose all use of his rear legs. Due to him being a large framed dog (135lbs) and over 10 years old, the chances of successful rehab were less than 50/50. I retired K9 Jake from active service in 2007 when I was promoted to Patrol Sergeant. he lived with the family as a pet until he collapsed suddenly in severe pain. After several days of tests, it was determined his spine was deteriorating which caused his disk to compress. If you don't remember, Jake replaced my last K9 partner Marco. Marco was the one who escaped from the kennel back in 2003 here in Melbourne Florida and was found after being struck by a car. I just wanted you to know I lost k9 Jake last week and if possible, I will send you a photo for your web site. let me know if you need a small bio on him and I will provide it.

 More from Scott:
K9 Jake was certified as a Police dog for the Melbourne Police Dept. in June of 2003. He was the replacement for Officer Scott Lindsley's Police dog who escaped from a local kennel in April 2003 and was struck and killed by a vehicle. Jake entered service as a 3 year old patrol/narcotic detection dog and served the citizens of Melbourne for four years prior to his handler being promoted to the rank of Sergeant. Jake was retired in September of 2007 and he lived at home with Sgt. Lindsley and his family until September 26 2010 when he suddenly collapsed in severe pain. After several days of tests, it was determined that Jake had several compressed disks in his spine, one of which was so severe it caused him to lose all use of his rear legs. Due to his age and his large frame and the fact his spine was degenerating and would only get worse over time, the chances of a successful surgery and rehab where slim. Because Jake's quality of life was severely diminished, it was determined that Jake's condition would only get worse so the decision to end his suffering was decided. Sgt. Lindsley said it was the hardest decision he has had to make. Even though it was for the best, the decision to end Jake's suffering was still very difficult. Jake will be missed for not only his exceptional skills in detecting hidden drugs and locating and apprehending criminals but for his great personality. He was one of the most requested K9's for demonstrations for young school aged children. He loved to play when not working and he was even known for helping weed the yard by grabbing and removing whatever weeds were pointed out to him. Jake was one special partner and will be missed. Rest in Peace.
submitted by Sgt. Scott Lindsley
 

In Loving Memory of
K9 JET
September 24, 2010

Handler: Deputy Tommy Willcox
Alachua County Sheriff's Office
2621 SE Hawthorne Rd.
Gainesville, FL  32641
 

Police dog Jet dies 
The Alachua County Sheriff's Office is mourning the cancer death of one of its K9s. Jet, the canine partner of Deputy Tommy Willcox, died Friday at Willcox's home. "He expired peacefully with his handler at his side," said sheriff's spokesman Art Forgey. The 8-year-old German shepherd's career with the Sheriff's Office began in September 2003. He was a dual-purpose dog certified in patrol work and bomb detection. His assignments included: working with the University Of Florida Police Department to search the Ben Hill Griffin Football Stadium before every home football game since 2004; assisting the Volusia County Sheriff's Office with bomb searches at the Daytona Speedway for the past three years; and performed demonstrations at most of the county's elementary schools.
 
Forgey said Jet's medical problems became apparent on Aug. 31 during a training exercise with Willcox. The deputy noticed Jet was struggling to breathe, so he took Jet to a veterinarian. According to Forgey, X-rays taken at two veterinary clinics "confirmed that Jet had a rapidly spreading case of lung cancer but he did not retire. He continued to work up until his death." Forgey said the attributes that will likely be most remembered about Jet was that he enjoyed being around children and that when he was on duty, he "was ready to apprehend a suspect at a moment's notice."
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA

In Loving Memory of
K9 JOYCEE
September 6, 2010

Handler: Sgt. Narcotics Investigator Danny Dawson
81st Judicial District Attorney's Narcotics Div.
1327 3rd. Street
Floresville, Texas 78114
(830) 393-2200

On Monday 9/6/2010 I lost my second K-9 Joycee. The vet believes that Joycee was poisoned. His body was taken to Texas A&M Animal Lab for testing. If you get this e-mail I will let you know what the test results are.
RESULTS:
I have been waiting for the final report on Joycee. I am glad to report that he was not poisoned. I am Sad to report that his death could have possible been avoided. Please inform all Officers with a K-9 that even if their K-9 is on Heart Guard they still need to be tested for heart worms every year. I was told by my vet that even if the K-9 the K-9 can still get heart worms. Joycee had kidney problems and brain problems but heart worms is what killed him. He was tested in 2006 and has been on hear guard ever since but still got heart worms and I did not know until it was to late. Joycee made many narcotics seizures but could have made many more. In his short life he seized more than 2000 pounds of marijuana, over 10 pounds of methamphetamines and cocaine and over $500,000.00 in US Currency. Joycee was on the fast track to making a great career for himself.  

Please let other Officers know to have their K-9 tested every year no matter if they are on heart guard and no matter what, the vet says.


In Loving Memory of
K9 JOHNNY
September 13, 2010

Handler: O
fficer Brian Zebron
La Salle Police Department 
745-2nd St.
La Salle, IL  61301
815.223.2131
WEBSITE - http://lasalle-il.gov/content/police-department-2102010103718am.aspx

 La Salle police remember beloved K-9
La Salle police officer Brian Zebron said goodbye to a former partner and longtime pet this week. As old age and leg problems set in, former La Salle police dog Johnny was put to sleep Monday night." I still remember his first arrest like it was yesterday. It was a couple pot pipes and two grams of weed, it was real small but you remember it,” Zebron said. Over the course of eight years with the department, Johnny, a mixed breed of German shepherd and Belgian Malinois descent, would go on to find much more than just a couple grams of marijuana.

Within his first few weeks on the job, Johnny was being honored by the city council for his part in responding to 23 drug-related calls, resulting in nine arrests and the discovery and seizure of 2 pounds of marijuana, 17 drug pipes, and $530, the News Tribune reported at the time. During his career Johnny assisted with a number of large drug busts on local interstates, Zebron noted. “Having a dog is a very appreciated asset,” said La Salle police detective Mike Smudzinski. Some of Johnny’s days on the force were during a period when there were few local K-9 units, which meant he and Zebron were busy working all around the area, assisting on searches from west of Princeton to east of Marseilles.

“Now we have about 14 K-9 between La Salle and Bureau County and there were times when we were down to three or four,” Zebron said. Smudzinski joined the La Salle department at the same time as Zebron in 1997. Over the years, he’s gained a lot of respect for Zebron and his K-9 partners.  “(Zebron’s) one of the most dedicated, hardworking K-9 officers I’ve ever seen, who puts a lot of effort into making his dogs work exceptionally well,” Smudzinski said. Johnny joined the department in 2000, taking over duties for former K-9 Cash, a black Labrador that focused on drug busts.

“When we got Johnny, drug work was a huge part of what he did, but he also did multi-purpose,” Zebron said. The other purposes included building searches, protecting his handler and other officers — “Which came in handy, especially with bar fights downtown,” Zebron said — and tracking. Zebron can remember Johnny using his powerful nose to uncover a loaded handgun thrown by a suspect during a foot chase at night as well as chasing down suspects that ran away from human police officers. “He didn’t have the speed lately, but in his prime it didn’t take him long to catch up to the suspect,” Zebron said.

Despite all the exciting action, Zebron said his favorite memories with Johnny were the days they’d visit school children to put on demonstrations. After retiring in 2008, Johnny went home with Zebron where he became the family pet and was joined not long after by Zebron’s current K-9 partner Justis. “I look at Johnny, he had eight years of non-stop fun every time he went out,” Zebron said. “I know in my mind he had the best life he could have.”
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA 


In Loving Memory of
K9 JUNO
August 2010

Handler: Officer Brian Trotta
Cincinnati Police Department
310 Ezzard Charles Dr.
  Cincinnati, OH 45214

(513)352-3536 fax:(513)352.2949

Cincinnati police dog dies after being left in hot vehicle

 The Cincinnati Police Department is mourning the death of one of its narcotics dogs who died after being left in a hot vehicle. Police say Specialist Brian Trotta was responding to a family medical emergency on Thursday and inadvertently left his canine Juno unattended in the vehicle. The city has been under a heat emergency for most of the week with temperatures soaring into the upper 90s.  Juno was the first female German shepherd added to the department in July 2009. Trotta is a 13-year veteran of the department and has been assigned to the canine unit since April 2009.
He has been placed on administrative leave.  The incident remains under investigation.
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA

In Loving Memory of
K9 JACK
July 19, 2010


Handler: Officer Matt Piatt
Cushing Police Department

100 Judy Adams Blvd

Cushing, Oklahoma 74023

(918)225-1212

 K9 Cop Dead
“Officer down” was the call Monday that numbed members of the Cushing Police Department. And again left the department without a canine division. Jack, a 2-year-old German shepherd that joined CPD in January, on Monday was found dead, Police Chief Terry Brannon confirmed. The cause of his death is under investigation. “The loss for us is pretty big,” Brannon said. “Jack played a pretty big role in our department. “He just finished up training last weekend in Stillwater. He had a really good training session, which made him an even more vital part of our department.”
Cushing Police Officer Matt Piatt discovered Jack inside his kennel, which is at Piatt’s residence. Brannon, Maj. Tully Folden and Animal Control Officer Martin Griesel went to Piatt’s home to assist. Brannon contacted Brian McNeal, veterinarian for the CPD, and later took Jack to Oklahoma State University Veterinary Sciences for a full autopsy. Doctors at OSU determined the death to have been caused by an internal issue. After putting together the pieces, Brannon said, it turns out a reward given
 Jack led to his demise.

“In March, we determined, he was given a chew toy as a reward for good work finding some drugs,” Brannon said. “He chewed it up and apparently some of it lodged inside his intestines. “We took him to Dr. McNeal that day. “Sadly, that is what Jack succumbed to.” Brannon before Tuesday afternoon’s report said results of the autopsy would determine the next steps taken by Cushing police. Brannon met Monday with City Manager Steve Spears to discuss the situation. Had it been determined Jack died from a pre-existing condition unknown to CPD at the time of his purchase, he would be
 replaced by the seller, Brannon said.
Jack was purchased in January from Worldwide Canine of Spring Branch, Texas, one of the world’s leading providers of police patrol and drug dogs. He took the place of Nando, who had been the CPD K-9 officer since July 2008. Nando went back to Worldwide Canine, Folden said, and is again for sale after he and Piatt “didn’t hit it off.” “That’s pretty common,” Folden said. “Shepherds usually do not work very well with a second handler.” Folden was the human part of the CPD’s K-9 division until his promotion in December to deputy chief. His partnership with Nando ended a period of 18 months CPD went without a dog.
“Having never suffered the loss of a partner, I can only imagine the grief Officer Piatt must be sensing,” Brannon said. “It’s a huge loss for us but it’s an even bigger loss to Matt. “It’s like having a human partner in his car with him all the time.” Brannon said standard procedure dictates police dogs stay at the residence of their partners. The police department provides a kennel complete with a sprinkler system, food and anything else required for maintaining the dog. Because Jack died of something contracted during his time with CPD, Brannon said, the department would be out the cost of replacing him.
Brannon estimated the purchase price of a K-9 officer at between $8,500 and $9,500. “And that’s being very conservative,” he said. “So much goes into a dog: where you buy one, how he has been handled. You don’t just show up at a kennel and say ‘we’re going to buy this dog.’ “When we got Jack, people from all over country were there buying dogs.”
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA


In Loving Memory of
K9 JACK
July 1, 2010

Handler: Officer Christopher Galluppo
Jacksonville Police Department

1412 West Main Street
Jacksonville, AR 72076-4397
(501) 982-3191
 

Police dog dies after snake bite
The Jacksonville Police Department lost one of its canines July 1. Jeff, a 3-year-old German shepherd, died from anaphylactic shock as a result of a snake bite. According to a press release, Jeff began his career with the department July 13, 2008. He was a certified dual purpose — patrol and narcotic — canine and was assigned to officer Christopher Galluppo. He contributed to numerous drug arrests and was responsible for the seizures of numerous grams of cocaine, marijuana and methamphetamine. The department is looking into replacing Jeff; however, police dogs cost between $8,000 and $10,000 fully trained. Then, the officer who is assigned the canine has to train to become certified with the canine. Anyone who would like to help fund canine Jeff’s replacement may call April Kiser at 982-3191.
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA


In Loving Memory of
K9 JEFF
July 16, 2010

Handler: Officer Christopher Galluppo
Jacksonville Police Department
1412 West Main Street
Jacksonville, AR 72076-4397
(501) 982-3191


Police dog dies after snake bite

The Jacksonville Police Department lost one of its canines July 1. Jeff, a 3-year-old German shepherd, died from anaphylactic shock as a result of a snake bite.
According to a press release, Jeff began his career with the department July 13, 2008. He was a certified dual purpose — patrol and narcotic — canine and was assigned to officer Christopher Galluppo. He contributed to numerous drug arrests and was responsible for the seizures of numerous grams of cocaine, marijuana and methamphetamine.
The department is looking into replacing Jeff; however, police dogs cost between $8,000 and $10,000 fully trained. Then, the officer who is assigned the canine has to train to become certified with the canine. Anyone who would like to help fund canine Jeff’s replacement may call April Kiser at 982-3191.
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA


In Loving Memory of
K9 JADA
May 8, 2010
 
Handler:
John Chamberlin
Foxboro Police Department
40 South St.
Foxboro, Massachusetts 02035
(508)543-4343

Officers, family mourn loss of Jada

By Bill Stedman and Frank Mortimer

Jada, the Foxboro Police department's drug-sniffing dog, made lots of friends in town and around the area during her two years on duty.
And many mourned when the 30-pound, black
Labrador-beagle mix died last weekend as a result of swallowing a hard plastic spoon during a recent drug search at an area school.
Jada, who would have turned four years old this July, was cremated Tuesday at Angel View Pet Cemetery in Middleboro with "full police honors," attended by two dozen police officers from area canine units, according to Foxboro Police officer John Chamberlin, Jada's handler.
"My kids were really impressed how many people showed up for Jada," he said. "She lived with our family. She was part of our family the whole time. It's been devastating, but the support I and my family received from the citizens of Foxboro has been great."
Chamberlin said Jada, who was rescued as a pup from the streets of Brockton, died "doing what she loved doing, and I'm sure she passed a happy, satisfied dog."  Chamberlin brought Jada to the department in 2008 to use in various search operations.
He began to train with the dog in July, 2008, and they first hit the streets together that October, continuing a Foxboro tradition started in 1974 by the late officer Pete Taggart. The members of Girl Scout Troop 80971 adopted Jada as a project, and raised money for items needed to protect the dog in the line of work. "She made a lot of friends in town and was a valuable asset to the department," police chief Edward O'Leary said. She was credited with a number of drug arrests, he said.
During the dog's short career she located hundreds of grams of cocaine and heroin, sniffed out a total of 20 pounds of marijuana, and became the only dog to ever find drugs in a cell in the Norfolk House of Corrections, Chamberlin said.
The man and dog team also gave demonstrations for school and civic groups. With Jada the attention-getting prop, Chamberlin would tell kids of the dangers of drug abuse.
"She was a true public servant, making the streets of Foxboro safer for the citizens who live here," he said Wednesday.
Jade collapsed last Thursday in training in Braintree, and was taken to Foxboro Animal Hospital, where she underwent surgery and later died of complications. The spoon she swallowed had become lodged in the animal's intestines, Chamberlin said.
Chamberlin said Dr. Richard Moschella had donated all of Jada's veterinary services throughout the animal's police career.
Chamberlin said he hopes Foxboro's canine program will continue. But, for now, the family is missing a friend whose stay was too short.
"She was like the clown at home, and at work she was all about finding the drugs," Chamberlin said. "She was like a Jeckyll and Hyde -- she went from all business at work to all play at home."
The Chamberlin family keeps Jada's ashes in a wooden urn on the fireplace mantel, along with the dog's working color, a green loop decorated with shamrocks.  "She'll be with us forever now," he said.
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA
MORE:
Drug-sniffing dog who died last weekend gets burial with full police honors
FOXBORO - Jada, the Foxboro Police department's drug-sniffing dog, made lots of friends in town and around the area during her two years on duty.  And many mourned when the 30-pound, black Labrador-beagle mix died last weekend as a result of swallowing a hard plastic spoon during a recent drug search at an area school. Jada, who would have turned 4 years old in July, was cremated Tuesday at Angel View Pet Cemetery in Middleboro with "full police honors," attended by two-dozen police officers from area canine units, according to Foxboro police Officer John Chamberlin, Jada's handler. "My kids were really impressed how many people showed up for Jada," he said. "She lived with our family. She was part of our family the whole time. It's been devastating, but the support I and my family received from the citizens of Foxboro has been great."  Chamberlin said Jada, who was rescued as a pup from the streets of Brockton, died "doing what she loved doing, and I'm sure she passed a happy, satisfied dog." Chamberlin brought Jada to the department in 2008 to use in various search operations. He began to train with the dog in July 2008, and they first hit the streets together that October, continuing a Foxboro tradition started in 1974 by the late Officer Pete Taggart.  The members of Girl Scout Troop 80971 adopted Jada as a project, and raised money for items needed to protect the dog in the line of work.  "She made a lot of friends in town and was a valuable asset to the department," Police Chief Edward O'Leary said.  She was credited with a number of drug arrests, he said.
During the dog's short career, she located hundreds of grams of cocaine and heroin, sniffed out a total of 20 pounds of marijuana and became the only dog to ever find drugs in a cell in the Norfolk House of Corrections, Chamberlin said. The man and dog team also gave demonstrations for school and civic groups. With Jada the attention-getting prop, Chamberlin would tell kids of the dangers of drug abuse.  "She was a true public servant, making the streets of Foxboro safer for the citizens who live here," he said.
Jeda collapsed last Thursday in training in Braintree, and was taken to Foxboro Animal Hospital, where she underwent surgery and later died of complications.  The spoon she swallowed had become lodged in her intestines, Chamberlin said. Chamberlin said Dr. Richard Moschella had donated all of Jada's veterinary services throughout the animal's police career. Chamberlin said he hopes Foxboro's canine program will continue.  But, for now, the family is missing a friend whose stay was too short. "She was like the clown at home, and at work she was all about finding the drugs," Chamberlin said. "She was like a Jeckyll and Hyde - she went from all business at work to all play at home."  The Chamberlin family keeps Jada's ashes in a wooden urn on the fireplace mantel, along with the dog's working collar, a green loop decorated with shamrocks.  "She'll be with us forever now," he said.

In Loving Memory of
K9 JASOU

February 2010
Handler: Officer Michael Sawyer  
Scarborough Police Department
246 Route 1
Scarborough, ME 04074 
Phone 883-6361    
 
Rallying around the memory of a trusted friend
Friends and colleagues mourn the loss of Jasou, a Scarborough police dog, and quickly raise funds to pay
for his successor.
3/27/10  Maine
 
After more than seven years with the Scarborough Police Department, the German shepherd succumbed last month to a lung condition called sudden pneumothorax. As one of the department's two dogs that were cross-trained in patrol and narcotics work, Jasou left a large hole in the police force and the lives of those who worked with him. Unsolicited donations started coming to the department soon after the death of Jasou (pronounced Hey-zu). Businesses, the Scarborough Public Dispatchers Association and the Westbrook Police Association were among the contributors for a new K-9.

In all, the department received $6,900, which should cover most or all of the price of an appropriate but untrained dog. Officer James Farrenkopf, president of the Westbrook Police Association, said his department's K-9 program works closely with its counterparts in Scarborough and other nearby communities. "They needed some help. We couldn't think of a better way to help them," Farrenkopf said. "We know how expensive a K-9 program can be."

Eric Berry, Scarborough's lead dispatcher, said members of his union knew Jasou. He wasn't surprised that business people who didn't know the dog also wanted to contribute. "As big as Scarborough seems to be, there's still a lot of town orientation," he said. While missing his partner terribly, Officer Michael Sawyer has been working to find a new K-9. Sawyer said the new dog will work with him but won't be considered a replacement for Jasou.

Sawyer and Jasou had been together since the dog was 15 months old. They lived together and worked together to find lost people, track down suspects, locate hidden drugs and do community outreach. "It's so much of what I do. It's at home and it's at work. It's my job," Sawyer said. "That's the toughest part for me. Not only did I lose a great friend and partner, I wasn't able to continue to do what I do." Jasou – he came with the name from the Belgian vendor – was notable for his gentle behavior and intense work ethic, Sawyer said. The police dog played so nicely that Sawyer had no worries about bringing his newborn daughter home.

Jasou was driven when it came to tracking, showing more interest in the work than the toy reward. The new police dog won't necessarily be a German shepherd, although Sawyer said that breed trains well and is well-suited to Maine's cold winters. Scent detection is a necessary trait, as are a social temperament and the ability to work in various environments without getting spooked. A dog's patrol work includes protecting its handler, a role that can involve biting. Police Chief Robert Moulton said some of the business donors wished to remain anonymous. All of the donors will eventually be invited to meet the new dog in the Town Council chambers, and those who don't prefer anonymity will be recognized.
(
Died -pneumothorax-A collapsed lung, or pneumothorax, is the collection of air in the space around the lungs.
This buildup of air puts pressure on the lung, so it cannot expand as much as it normally does when you take a breath
)

submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA


In Loving Memory of
K9 JESSI

March 14, 2010
Handler: Sgt. Trent Kempster
Tuscaloosa Sheriff's Office
714  1/2 Greensboro Ave.
Tuscaloosa, AL  354001
PH: 205 752.0616
 
Well-known Tuscaloosa police dog dies
During her law enforcement career, Jessi worked security for former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, patrolled Bryant-Denny Stadium at every University of Alabama football game and visited hundreds of school kids through the years. The German shepherd suffered a stroke Sunday afternoon and died later that day. Her handler, Sgt. Trent Kempster, said she was 15 or 16 years old. Kempster trained with Jessi in September 2000 after the department bought her from Holland.  
After becoming certified, the dog was one of the few police dogs in Alabama trained in explosives detection. She was also trained to track people. Jessi and Kempster traveled across the state after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, performing explosives sweeps at Auburn home football games and other events. She was also popular with the students she visited at schools in Tuscaloosa. “She was probably the best dog I've ever had,” Kempster said. “She was very friendly and would let the kids pet her and play with her.  
She was just a great, great dog for police work.” Kempster worked with Jessi for five years before she retired in 2005. He said he occasionally runs into people who ask about Jessi and remember her from the community events she attended. For the last five years of her life, she lived at his home on 3 acres with his two other dogs. Kempster noticed a lump on Jessi's stomach a few years ago that turned out to be cancerous. The dog recovered fully after an operation and maintained a frisky, puppy-like personality until her health began to fail about a month ago. After suffering the stroke on Sunday, she was unable to stand, Kempster said, and he made the decision to have her put to sleep.
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA

In Loving Memory of
K9 JARNO
February 24, 2010

Handler:
Sgt. Bob Cooley
Rockdale County Sheriff’s Office

911 Chambers Drive
Conyers GA 30012
Phone - (770) 278-8000 - Fax - (770) 483-4543

info@rockdalesheriff.com

The Sheriff's Office will hold a memorial service in honor of Jarno on Friday, March 12 at 2 p.m. at the Rockdale County Sheriff's Office Courtyard Area.

Rockdale County Sheriff’s Office will hold a memorial service for one of its K-9 deputies next week. Jarno, an 11-year-old Belgium Malinois, died unexpectedly Feb. 24, according to a RCSO press release. A memorial service will be 2 p.m. March 12 in the RCSO courtyard area. Jarno was cremated and leaves behind three other RCSO canine members of the K-9 Unit, according to Rockdale County Sheriff Jeff Wigington. Two of the remaining RCSO canines are dual-purpose dogs, like Jarno. Dual purpose police dogs are trained in handler protection, tracking and locating narcotics, article recovery and criminal apprehension. The third is a black lab trained in drug detection.
“Of course, he will never be replaced, but we do intend on purchasing another dog,” Wigington said. The late Conyers resident and retired DeKalb Police Lt. Mac McGlamery trained Jarno and owned him until his death in 2007. Jarno joined the RCSO force in February of that year, with Sgt. Bob Cooley as his handler. Cooley was responsible for caring for the dog around the clock, taking him into his home to do so, explained Wigington in Monday’s RCSO press release. “The position of a K-9 deputy places the officer in the highest risk category of the policing world, yet they do it because they love the job,” Wigington said in the press release. According to the press release, Jarno helped in the seizure of so many drugs and cash during his three-year career that Sgt. Cooley could not even speculate the exact amount. “He has been a great asset to the department. We all saw him as more of a co-worker or a four-legged officer rather than just an animal,” Wigington said in the press release.
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA & photo by Taye Pierce.
MORE ABOUT THE K9 UNIT:
The Rockdale County Sheriff’s Office has three full time K-9’s and three trained, certified K-9 deputies. The teams are trained in narcotic detection, tracking, apprehension and article/building searches. One of the primarily responsibilities of each K-9 is the interdiction of all types of illegal narcotics. The K-9 deputies also respond to requests from other divisions for assistance, as well as other agencies.


In Loving Memory of
K9 JAKE
January 8, 2010

Handler: Deputy Allen Barger
SLO Sheriff's Department

(San Luis Obispo)
1585 Kansas Avenue
San Luis Obispo, CA  93405

website: http://www.slosheriff.org/index.aspx

 Sheriff's Department's drug-detecting dog, Jake, dies of cancer
San Luis Obispo Sheriff’s Department is mourning the death of Jake, a longtime police dog that deputies say is responsible for hundreds of drug-related arrests. Jake, a 12-year-old Labrador, died this morning from cancer, officials said in a statement. He was assigned to Deputy Allen Barger for the past eight years. Officials said the four-legged deputy was responsible for more than
 2,000 searches, 900 arrests and the detection of 381,599 grams of marijuana, 10,054 grams of cocaine, 14,515 grams of methamphetamine, 208 grams of heroin and 47 firearms in his career, according to Rob Bryn, Sheriff's Department spokesman.  “Jake was a member of the Sheriff’s Department who gave his all every day to keep narcotics off the streets of our county,” Sheriff Pat Hedges said in the statement. Barger is training a new dog, Jack, to replace Jake.
submitted by Jim Cortina, Dir. CPWDA